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How Aligned is CTE

How Aligned is Career and Technical Education to Local Labor Markets?

The recent reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act—the principal federal education program supporting career and technical education (CTE)—expressly aims to “align workforce skills with labor market needs.”

How Aligned is Career and Technical Education to Local Labor Markets?, co-authored by Pepperdine University associate professor Cameron Sublett and Fordham Institute senior research and policy associate David Griffith, examines whether students in high school CTE programs are more likely to take courses in high-demand and/or high-wage industries, both nationally and locally. By linking CTE course-taking data from the High School Longitudinal Survey to employment data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, it seeks to answer three central research questions:

Cameron Sublett, David Griffith 4.3.2019
NationalReport
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How Aligned is CTE

How Aligned is Career and Technical Education to Local Labor Markets?

The recent reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical Education Act—the principal federal education program supporting career and technical education (CTE)—expressly aims to “align workforce skills with labor market needs.” Our latest report examines whether students in high school CTE programs are more likely to take courses in high-demand and/or high-wage industries, both nationally and locally.

Cameron Sublett, David Griffith 4.3.2019
NationalReport
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Toward a Golden Age of Educational Practice

In recent years, we have reached a homeostasis in education policy, characterized by clearer and fairer but lighter-touch accountability systems and the incremental growth of school choice options for families—but little appetite for big and bold new initiatives.

Michael J. Petrilli 3.14.2019
NationalReport
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Do Private Schools Serve as Oases in Charter School Deserts?

Last April, we published a report by Andrew Saultz and colleagues highlighting “charter school deserts” across the country, or high poverty areas that lack charter schools.

Andrew Saultz, Queenstar Mensa-Bonsu, Christopher Yaluma, James Hodges 12.12.2018
NationalNew Media
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Gotta Give 'Em Credit: State and District Variation in Credit Recovery Participation Rates

Credit recovery, or the practice of enabling high school students to retrieve credits from courses that they either failed or failed to complete, is at the crossroads of two big trends in education: the desire to move toward “competency based” education and a push to dramatically boost graduation rates.

Adam Tyner, Ph.D., Nicholas Munyan-Penney 11.29.2018
NationalReport
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Grade Inflation in High Schools (2005–2016)

Although the vast majority of American parents believe their child is performing at or above grade level, in reality two-thirds of U.S. teenagers are ill-prepared for college when they leave high school.

Seth Gershenson 9.19.2018
NationalReport
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The State of State Standards Post-Common Core

Eight years ago, we compared states’ English language arts (ELA) and mathematics standards to what were then the newly-minted Common Core State Standards. That report found that the Common Core was clearer and more rigorous than the ELA standards in thirty-seven states and stronger than the math standards in thirty-nine states.

David Griffith, Victoria McDougald, Solomon Friedberg, Diane Barone, Juliana Belding, Andrew Chen, Linda Dixon 8.22.2018
NationalReport
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Charter School Deserts: High-Poverty Neighborhoods with Limited Educational Options

2016–17 was one of the slowest-growth years for charter schools in recent memory. Nobody knows exactly why, but one hypothesis is saturation: With charters having achieved market share of over 20 percent in more than three dozen cities, perhaps school supply is starting to meet parental demand, making new charters less necessary and harder to launch.

Andrew Saultz, Queenstar Mensa-Bonsu, Christopher Yaluma, James Hodges 4.26.2018
NationalReport
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Is There a Gifted Gap? Gifted Education in High-Poverty Schools

Schools have long failed to cultivate the innate talents of many of their young people, particularly high-ability girls and boys from disadvantaged and minority backgrounds. This failure harms the economy, widens income gaps, arrests upward mobility, and exacerbates civic decay and political division.

Christopher Yaluma, Adam Tyner, Ph.D. 1.31.2018
NationalReport
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The Academic and Behavioral Consequences of Discipline Policy Reform

One important question about school discipline is whether it helps or harms those being disciplined. But a second, equally important question is whether a push to reduce the number of suspensions is harmful to the rule-abiding majority.

Matthew Steinberg, Johanna Lacoe 12.5.2017
NationalReport
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Rating the Ratings: An Analysis of the 51 ESSA Accountability Plans

The Every Student Succeeds Act grants states more authority over their accountability systems than did No Child Left Behind, but have they seized the opportunity to develop school ratings that are clearer and fairer than those in the past?

Brandon L. Wright, Michael J. Petrilli 11.14.2017
NationalReport